Mobile Privacy.

Complying with the Federal Trade Commission and COPPA

 

As of July 1, 2013, websites and mobile apps directed towards children under the age of 13 have been ordered to comply with the FTC’s updated act to conform to children’s online privacy. The 38-page document guides companies through frequently asked questions as well as thorough explanations of what is to be considered personal information. In order for companies to collect personal information such as email addresses or even analytics, parental consent must first be given.

As companies try to make sure that they are compliant with COPPA, many find themselves questioning whether the law even applies to their business and website. Although some are hesitant, the $16,000 fee per violation has caused many executives to refrain from even placing analytics in their product.

With this caution and confusion, what is the easy answer? How can a company attracting users under the age of 13 easily gain parental consent and legally collect personal information? With no direct solution, companies like Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) and the Association for Competitive Technology (ACT4apps) are working diligently to protect children and ensure that their privacy is guaranteed. With this approach to the FTC’s mandate, Apollo Matrix has approached mobile privacy with great persistence to understanding and discovering a solution that is easy to use for developers while also providing benefits to the user.

imgres